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Andy Redsmith: Breaking the Lore

WoW sat down with Andy Redsmith who is releasing his novel Breaking the Lore with Canelo in spring next year. Andy was a finalist in Pulp Idol 2017. 

Hi Andy, tell us a little bit about your book! (Or as much as you’re allowed to!)
Breaking the Lore is a fantasy crime comedy. This might not even be a genre – it is now! I have deliberately mixed things up in order to produce something a bit different. It is intended to appeal to people who enjoy well-constructed fantasy that doesn’t always take itself too seriously. Having said that, the draft has been enjoyed by beta readers of all ages, both sexes, and who read a variety of different genres; so I think it has a lot of crossover appeal too.
 
What brought you to write this book?
I’ve been a Sci Fi fan for as long as I can remember, from early Doctor Who and Star Trek through Asimov and Herbert. I love the idea of strange beings in strange places who still have to deal with the problems we ‘ordinary humans’ do. I also like seeing what happens to ‘ordinary humans’ who find themselves in these strange places. I’ve never seen any reason why you can’t have Fantasy, Sci Fi and ‘real world’ all co-existing. I guess that stems from growing up with Marvel Comics, where they have superheroes, secret agents, mad scientists, magic, vampires and all sorts of other things in the same universe. So, I thought, how do I pull these disparate influences into one story? Can I write a crime fantasy science fiction comedy? Answer: No, I can’t. That’s just too manic. But could I write a fantasy comedy based around a detective story with some sci-fi references? Yes, I thought, I could. So I did.
 
What is your writing process like?
I wish I could say I sit down to write and wonderful prose simply flows out, but it ain’t like that. I have an overall plan which says ‘start here – end here’, and has specific plot points that I have to hit along the way. Between the plot points I like to go with the flow – within reason. Doing this gives me a bit of freedom to see how things go, but without getting too far off the overall plan. Then, for each chapter, I think of the elements I want to include, work out the order to put them in, determine how to get from one point to another, then put in dialogue and jokes to link things together. It doesn’t sound very creative when I look at it like that. But it works for me! Probably not a process I would recommend to other people.
 
What drew you to Canelo Publishing House? 
I had a couple of offers, but the people at Canelo were friendly, helpful, open and supportive. I thought “these are people I would like to work with.”
 
What's next for you? What are you working on now?
I am currently writing the second book in the Inspector Paris series. It follows on from Breaking the Lore, with the same setting and same group of characters, but gets into whole new areas of magic world mayhem.
 
You were in the Pulp Idol competition. What were your experiences during the competition?
Really good. Having to read out what I’ve written was a bit daunting at first, but definitely worthwhile. I found that the act of reading it to a large group of complete strangers made me more confident in the writing. Plus all the people from WoW were great and made the whole thing run smoothly. 
 
What book would you recommend sci fi/fantasy writers to read? Why?
One book? Hell’s bells! SFF is such a broad church with so many subgenres that I’d struggle to think of one book that everyone should read. If I really had to pick just one I would probably go for (and I know there’ll be lots of disagreement) The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy. Class.

Check out Andy's website here